10 Most Affordable Places to Live in North Carolina in 2024

North Carolina, known for its diverse landscapes including mountains, beaches, and vibrant cities, provides a relatively low cost of living compared to the national average. However, the affordability varies across regions, influenced by factors such as housing, transportation, healthcare, and utilities. If you’re seeking economical living options in North Carolina for 2024, here are ten considerations:

Eden

A small city in Rockingham County, Eden, with around 15,000 residents, boasts the lowest median home value on this list at $135,635. Additionally, the city offers a modest median rent of $900 and a transportation cost 23.1% below the national average. Notably, Eden is renowned for its historical museum showcasing the city’s heritage in textiles, tobacco, and furniture.

Rocky Mount

Situated in Nash and Edgecombe counties, Rocky Mount, with a population of approximately 54,000, features a median home value of $190,780 and a below-average median rent of $850. The city also provides healthcare costs 12.6% lower than the national average. Home to the Rocky Mount Mills, a transformed historic cotton mill complex, the city offers a mix of shops, restaurants, and breweries.

Fayetteville

As the sixth-largest city in North Carolina, Fayetteville, in Cumberland County, houses around 209,000 residents. With a median home value of $199,299 and a median rent of $1,050, Fayetteville stands out as an affordable option among larger cities. Additionally, its utilities cost is 9.8% below the national average. Fayetteville boasts attractions like the Cape Fear Botanical Garden and the Historic Downtown Fayetteville.

Thomasville

A small city in Davidson County, Thomasville, with a population of about 27,000, offers a median home value of $214,034 and a median rent of $1,000. Recognized for its annual Everybody’s Day festival, Thomasville also showcases a symbol of its furniture industry – a giant chair.

Asheboro

Located in Randolph County, Asheboro, with a population of around 27,000, presents a median home value of $227,305 and a median rent of $1,000. While slightly above the state average, it remains affordable. Asheboro is home to the North Carolina Zoo, the largest natural habitat zoo globally, and is the birthplace of NASCAR legend Richard Petty.

Burlington

A mid-sized city in Alamance and Guilford counties, Burlington, home to approximately 59,000 residents, offers a median home value of $228,886 and a median rent of $1,100. Falling close to the state average, it also features healthcare costs 5.1% lower than the national average. Burlington is known for its annual Carousel Festival, celebrating the city’s historic Dentzel Carousel.

Greenville

Greenville, a large city in Pitt County, with around 89,000 residents, is the tenth-largest in the state. With a median home value of $229,059 and a median rent of $1,197, it remains slightly above the state average but below the national average. The city serves as a hub for education, healthcare, and entertainment, offering cultural amenities like the Greenville Museum of Art and River Park North.

Tarboro

A small town in Edgecombe County, Tarboro, housing about 11,000 residents, showcases a median home value of $230,000 and a median rent of $1,000. Slightly above the state average, it maintains affordability with utilities costs 8.2% lower than the national average. Tarboro’s historic district features buildings from the 18th and 19th centuries, and it hosts the Tar River Festival.

Kinston

Kinston, a small city in Lenoir County, home to around 20,000 residents, offers a median home value of $230,000 and a median rent of $1,000. Slightly above the state average, the city stands out for its low transportation costs (10.4% below the national average) and its historical significance in the American Revolution and Civil War.

Lenoir

Nestled in Caldwell County, Lenoir, with a population of approximately 18,000, features a median home value of $230,000 and a median rent of $1,000. While slightly above the state average, Lenoir offers healthcare costs 4.9% lower than the national average. Known for its scenic views and outdoor activities in the Blue Ridge Mountains, Lenoir also thrives on its furniture industry and showcases local craftsmanship through museums and galleries.

READ MORE

What Does Climate Change Look Like in Delaware?

Leave a Comment